The Project Log

The Project Log

Contents

Howgozit…Not bad, so far

Over the past fourteen years we’ve had some really exciting projects come our way, and we’ve had the opportunity to work with some great people. In aviation, nearly everything is a team effort. It takes a lot of dedicated professionals to move millions of people from here to there, year after year with the kind of safety record any industry could rightly boast about. When it comes to ICAW, we’re just glad to be here, part of the team.

Over the years we’ve delivered over eighty projects, and we’re not counting revisions—there were many of those. Our manuals are in distribution in over 30 countries. Indirectly, we written for most of the big bird builders, and some of the biggest companies in aviation: engineering firms, manufacturing companies, MROs, lessors… We like to think we’ve done our part on behalf of our clients. Rare is the case where we produce just a single manual for anyone.

We’re always on the hunt for the next interesting project, the next big challenge, the next great client. If you’ve gotten this far down our website, you may be exactly the person we’re looking for. Give us a call and see what we can do for you.

 

 

Matsushita Avionics Systems Corporation

In 2000 the Matsushita Avionics Systems Corporation (MASC, now Panasonic) began installation of their System 2000 In-flight Entertainment System aboard wide-body and long-haul commercial airplanes. This system used dedicated computers and an on-board LAN to distribute video, audio, and flight information to configured seats and the passenger cabin. The system was the first to employ digital flat screen displays both in the seats and in the overhead.

A group of contractors were brought in to document installations being done by Boeing and Airbus Industries, and by MROs in the aftermarket. Rapid production of technical documentation supporting individual effectivities was the primary requirement, and Matsushita had a plan to make that happen.

MASC developed boilerplate illustrations and maintenance content for the system and each of its components, and developed sample procedures to assist in the production of content for items required to support individual airplanes. In effect, the MASC set of descriptions and procedures was a manual implementation of what is now know as a Content Management System (CMS). All contractors worked from the same core data set and produced manuals based on the same set of templates.

The contractors were responsible for reading the drawings and schematics and generating the missing illustrations, power diagrams, block diagrams, and troubleshooting procedures for individual airplanes. The contractors were responsible for being the subject matter experts (SMEs) and reconciling engineering data with the actual airplane configurations.

PTWS came into the project as a subcontractor working with the RM Shank / SAI team a couple of months after the launch. We went into simultaneous development of the first two Boeing 777 manuals and delivered both complete manuals within six months. The manuals were reviewed, accepted, and delivered to Korean Airlines without changes. Over the next eight months we completed 16 more manual projects, including prototype manuals for the legacy MAS PES system scheduled for installed on Boeing 747 and McDonnell-Douglas DC-10 airplanes.

The Matsushita manuals were assigned for completion either as full manuals, or parted out in sections. The sections were identified by codes as follows: System Description (SD), Component Descriptions (CD), Component Locations (LO), Adjustment and Testing (AT), Removal and Installation (RI), Maintenance (MN), Computer Screens (CS).

 

Asiana Airlines B747-400 AMM 44-20-01 MASC PES, Full Prototype Manual

Asiana Airlines B777-200 System 2000E AMM 44-21-04, Full Manual

Austrian Airlines A340-300 System 2000E AMM 44-21-25, AT, MN, CS, LO

Austrian Airlines A340-300 System 2000E AMM 44-21-26, AT, MN, CS, LO

Cathay Pacific Airlines B777-200 System 2000E AMM 44-21-13, Full Manual

El Al Airlines B747-400 System 2000E AMM 23-38-49, Full Manual

El Al Airlines B747-400 System 2000E Installation Document ELA 1024-44-01

Iberia Airlines System B747-200 2000E AMM 23-38-25, Full Manual

Korean Airlines B777-200 System 2000E AMM 44-20-07, Full Manual

Korean Airlines B777-300 System 2000E AMM 44-20-08, Full Manual

Malaysia Airlines B777-200 System 2000E AMM 23-38-10, CD, CS, LO, MN

Northwest Airlines B747-200 MASC PES AMM 44-23-04, Full Prototype Manual

Northwest Airlines DC10-30 MASC PES AMM 44-23-05, Full Prototype Manual

Qantas Airlines B747-400 System 2000 AMM 23-38-19, Production Edits

Sabena Airlines A330-300 System 2000E AMM 44-21-08, CS, AT

Singapore Airlines B777-200 System 2000E AMM 23-38-12, Full Manual

Thai Airlines B747-400 System 2000E AMM 23-38-37, Production Edits

Turkish Airlines B737-800 MPES MKII System AMM 44-20-06, Illustration Support

 

Quiet Wing Security Systems

In response to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the FAA mandated that all passenger aircraft be fitted with secure flight station doors. The Quiet Wing Corporation (Quiet Wing Security Systems) was one of a handful of companies that managed to developed a viable design and get into production to meet the FAA deadline for product approval.

The door they designed was approved for installation on the Boeing 737 and later adapted for use on the Boeing 727 and the Convair CV-540. The door system was well conceived, well designed, and, built to be literally bulletproof. PTWS wrote and revised all of the AMMs and AIPCs to support that program.

 

B727-100 /-200 Secure Cockpit Door AMM and AIPC Supplements

B737-200 /-300 Secure Cockpit Door AMM and AIPC Supplements

B727-300 /-400 /-500 Secure Cockpit Door AMM and AIPC Supplements

Convair CV-540 Secure Cockpit Door AMM and AIPC Supplements

FedEx A300 / A310 Secure Cockpit Door Prelim Manuals

B737-100 /-200 Performance Modification Program / Research and Prelim manual development

B727-100 Aux Fuel Tank Configuration / Research and Prelim manual development

 

International Aero Interiors

PTWS began its business relationship with International Aero Interiors in 2004, and we provided primary technical writing support for that company through four changes of ownership. In 2012 International Aero Interiors, rebranded as Volant, was acquired by the VT Aerospace Group in Singapore.

For nearly a decade International Aero was our primary customer. We wrote and illustrated documents to support their STC projects, OEM designs, administrative requirements, and even did some graphic arts and minor marketing work for them. As Volant, they now have world-class engineering and technical support services available through the VT Aero group, but the work they sent our way moved us full-throttle into the aircraft interiors reconfiguration business. Our experience with International Aero changed our fundamental focus and redefined us as a company.

 

Futura Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 04 Mar 2004

Aeroflot Airlines B767 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 18 Aug 2003

Aeroflot Airlines B767 Interior Reconfig. WDM, 18 Aug 2003

Aeroflot Airlines B767 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 22 Dec 2005

Aeroflot Airlines B767 Interior Reconfig. WDM, 22 Mar 2006

Air Asia Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 15 Mar 2004

S7 Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 30 Jul 2007

Pegasus Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 16 Apr 2010

Pegasus Airlines B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 01 May 2006

Spice Jet Airlines B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 20 Oct 2010

Virgin Nigeria Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 07 Apr 2006

Royal New Zealand Air Force B757 Conversion AIPC, 15 Mar 2007

Royal New Zealand Air Force B757 Conversion Operations Manual, 30 Mar 2007

Air New Zealand B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 12 Apr 2008

Czech Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 27 Apr 2007

Euro Atlantic Airlines B757-200 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 26 May 2008

Israeli Air Intl. B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 30 Mar 2006

Jet Airways B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 01 Jun 2006

Air Baltic Airlines B737-300 /-400 /-500 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 10 May 2008

Hawaiian Airlines B767 Conversion AIPC Prelim. Manual, 01 Sep 2006

LAN Chile Interior Finish Specifications, Lavatory 052004-1001-1, -3 10 Apr 2006

International Aero Interiors CMM Lavatory Model No. 052004-1001-1, 20 Feb 2006

International Aero Interiors CMM Lavatory Model No. 052004-1001-3, 20 Jul 2007

International Aero Interiors CMM Ovrhd Stowage Assy IAII-413T1174, 20 Mar 2008

Additional Work on Quality Manuals, Process Documents, Graphic Artwork, etc.

 

Bruce Industries

Our association with Bruce Industries (now Bruce Aerospace) came about as a result of an Air Canada STC project handled by International Aero. IA took on the work for the engineering and hardware sales, and we picked up the ICAW portion of the project. The Bruce project employed an innovative, efficient, and highly reliable LED lighting system which replaced the existing OEM fluorescent lighting installation. This was our first project requiring direct interaction with DERs, project engineers, and manufacturing and design engineers. We worked with the Bruce team to develop the content for the AMMs and directly supported the development of the Troubleshooting and System Testing sections. The bulk of our WDM work was done in support of this STC.

Mood Lighting was our first project using Dassault Solidworks ® modeling data for the graphics used in the AIPC. Native AutoCAD ® drawings were used to develop the WDM diagrams.

In 2007 Bruce Industries was acquired by the Transdigm Group and they transitioned to Transdigm technical support at that time. The work they provided us was both challenging and interesting, and working with their engineering team was a terrifically rewarding experience. The support they provided, both on the engineering and managerial sides, was a model professional efficiency.

 

BR2800-767 Mood Lighting System Air Canada B767-300 WDM 33-21-111

BR2800-767 Mood Lighting System Air Canada B767-300 AIPC 33-21-112

BR2800-767 Mood Lighting System Air Canada B767-300 AMM 33-21-113

BR2800-767 Mood Lighting System Air Canada B767-300 WDM 33-21-114

BR2800-767 Mood Lighting System Air Canada B767-300 WDM 33-21-120

BR2800-767 Mood Lighting System Air Canada B767-300 AIPC 33-21-121

 

RM Shank & Associates

From the beginning we've had a business relationship with RM Shank and Associates. They brought the MASC project to us and have brokered several other small projects for us over the years. The owner, Mr. Richard Shank, has been somewhat of a mentor to us, providing us with challenging projects, interesting opportunities, and working as our interface with customers, leaving us to focus on production. Although no long active in the Pacific Northwest, Mr. Shank remains a highly respected person in this technical writing community. He has made a lasting impact in the field of aviation, and on this company.

 

Whittaker Controls CMM 30-22-11 Shutoff Valve 422615 Illustration Support

ASAP CMM 25-24-01 Class Divider Kit 04J011000-7 Illustration Support

CAI Modular Lavatory CMM Prelim Manuals (UPS STC Project)

 

Volant Aerospace

International Aero Interiors was bought out by a group of investors / former employees out of Chicago in 2009. This group rebranded the company as Volant and steered it into a very large contract with Allegiant Airlines. Near the end of the Allegiant contract, the group divested its interest in the reorganized company, selling it to the VT Aerospace Group, home-based in Singapore. We wrote in support of seven projects for Volant, including the Allegiant Airlines STC, which was the single largest project we've supported to date.

The Allegiant STC involve the reconfiguration of 53 MD-80 series aircraft, many no longer registered in the U.S. or certified to fly in American airspace. The engineering challenges offered by this project were significant and several revisions of the AIPC had to be generated based on soft data. The final version of the AIPC delivered by us, Revision B, weighed in at just under a thousand pages at final draft delivery. At that point we stepped away from active manual development. Volant made the decision to produce all future revisions and incremental updates in-house, and, recognizing the fact that many of the airplanes had significant issues relating to unique engineering, configuration mismatches, and difficulties relating to certification, we at PTWS supported that decision. We provided Volant with the native files, artwork, and templates needed to produce follow-on revisions, then we shook hands and went our separate ways.

We do not anticipate additional work from the VT Aerospace group. They have world-class technical resources and Volant no longer fits our target business demographic. Nevertheless, the Volant /Allegiant Airlines project was an extraordinary opportunity and a once-in-a career learning experience. We developed methods and automated templates to work at our higher level yet, and as big as the project was, in the end, it was just another book, and we handled Allegiant along with six other projects simultaneously.

 

Ethiopian Airlines B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 12 Aug 2009

Ethiopian Airlines B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 09 Nov 2009

Sun Airlines B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 15 May 2013

UT Air Airlines B737-600 /-700 /-800 /-900 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 15 May 2013

Allegiant Air MD-80 Interior Reconfig. AIPC, 28 Feb 2013

Volant Overhead Bin Assys 1007-7001, CMM 25-27-59A, 01 Sep 2012

Volant Overhead Bin Assys 1007-7017, CMM 25-27-60A, 04 Jan 2013

 

Aviation Partners Incorporated

We approached Aviation Partners in one of our periodic marketing efforts and they scheduled a brief with us to discuss the possibility of contracting out the writing on their Dassault Falcon 2000 Blended Winglet program. We expected to punch out a couple of manuals on a bolt-on wing tip mod, but when we arrived for the brief we quickly discovered that the API project was anything but a small modification to an existing installation. Six years later we are still writing maintenance documentation to support what is probably the most revolutionary winglet concept ever installed on an airplane. The Blended Winglet improves wing efficiency by an astounding 9 to 13 percent, depending on the model aircraft, and the design is so lightweight and robust that a pilot can fly home with the winglet shot full of holes.

Our initial project went into development in late 2007 and went into distribution in early 2008. Several revisions to the basic manual have been implemented since then. Shortly after API earned their STC for the F2000 winglet the design was adapted for use on the Falcon 900 and the Falcon 50 series aircraft. We've had the privilege to provide technical writing and illustration support for all of these projects.

In the process of manual development for API we have had the opportunity to work directly with DERs, contract engineers, manufacturing experts, and maintenance professionals. Where appropriate, we’ve offered suggestions and recommendations on maintenance and testing procedures, and have occasionally served as a “second set of eyes” for their drawings. API uses CATIA® software to generate the data set for the blended winglet, and this was our first opportunity to work directly with data and graphics generated in CATIA®.

 

Dassault Falcon 2000 Blended Winglet AMM APF2-0600

Dassault Falcon 2000 Blended Winglet AIPC APF2-0613

Dassault Falcon 2000 Blended Winglet SRM APF2-0602

Dassault Falcon 2000 Blended Winglet Specification Document APF2-0052

Dassault Falcon 900 Blended Winglet AMM APF9-0600

Dassault Falcon 900 Blended Winglet AIPC APF9-0613

Dassault Falcon 900 Blended Winglet SRM APF9-0602

Dassault Falcon 50 Blended Winglet AMM APF5-0600

Dassault Falcon 50 Blended Winglet AIPC APF5-0613

Dassault Falcon 50 Blended Winglet SRM APF5-0602

Page Notes:

Released: 17 Jun 14